Grief Makes You Crazy

The Grief Coaster: Understanding stress in grief

Stress is a given, whether it’s experienced in response to major life events or minor everyday occurrences. When life is going okay, your stress ebbs and flows. It’s kind of like one of those little kiddie roller coasters – all small peaks and tiny dips. When something terrible happens, your stress level rises dramatically and you …

Yearning in Grief and Loss

I’m a yearner; always have been and always will be. I ache for days and moments that exist only in the past. Childhood moments mostly, the majority of which involve my mother. These memories are particular to me and so I won’t bore you with them. Instead I’ll leave a blank space where you can insert …

Warning: Grief Side-Effects May Include Building Emotional Walls

We’ve been a little quiet on WYG this week, but hopefully you have been keeping up over on photogrief, where we posted our posted our March challenge!  In that post we challenged you to post your #griefweeds and #griefwildflowers images on photogrief and social media.  If you can’t even imagine what that means, go read …

When Grief Gets Physical: dealing with physical grief symptoms

There is simply no way to anticipate what grief feels like.  It is one of those experiences that you can describe to someone, but it is impossible to really understand it until you are forced to live with it.  Of all the unimaginable aspects of grief, there is one thing we hear people say time …

Using Defense Mechanisms in Grief

Defense mechanisms refer to behaviors used to protect oneself from unpleasant thoughts and emotions like guilt, anger, shame, and jealousy.  Some people find these yucky emotions so unacceptable that they will unconsciously employ defense mechanisms to prevent themselves from ever having to acknowledge or experience them. Sigmund Freud first proposed the concept of ‘defense mechanisms’ as …

“I should have known…”: Understanding Hindsight Bias in Grief

People have a natural tendency to sift through the ashes of tragedy in search of explanations. To quote Holocaust survivor and psychiatrist Viktor E. Frankl, “Man’s main concern is not to gain pleasure or to avoid pain but rather to see a meaning in his life.” The search for sense in the seemingly senseless is …


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