Thinking About Death and Dying

Questions of Life, Mortality and Grief

Existential angst and death anxiety run in my blood.  I think I get it from my Dad’s side of the family, although it’s hard to be sure.  Several of my immediate relatives have it and I’m pretty sure my 9 year old daughter does as well because she asks me about it all the time. For example, …

Where is my Hollywood ending?: When death isn’t peaceful, serene, or good

You know I love Hollywood as much as the next person, but I’m beginning to think I can’t trust everything I see in the movies.  Examples… 1. The average woman is 5’10” and weigh 110lbs, no matter their genetics, what they eat, or whether they exercise. 2. If I jump out of a fast moving car I’ll be …

Buddha, Nietzsche and Grief

Many moons ago I wrote a post about how philosophy became my primary grief support when I was in college.  Weird, I know.  But when you are 19 years old seeking grief support isn’t exactly on the top of the to-do list (or it certainly wasn’t for me).   Yet, despite the hundreds of articles here on the blog …

The Limited Language of Grief

I have been thinking about the limitations of language a lot lately, specifically when it comes to grief.  When you write and talk about grief as much as we do at What’s Your Grief, you become accutely aware of the ways in which language sometimes fails. There is nothing more frustrating than struggling to find the words to capture an …

The State of Good Grief Support: Impressions from the ADEC annual conference

This past week, in a Grand Hyatt a quarter of a mile from San Antonio’s River Walk, hundreds of professionals from the fields of death, dying, grief and bereavement converged for the Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC)’s Annual Conference. Renowned grief theorists, enthusiastic young students, hospice workers, grief therapists, and even a few grief-website–type-people all gathered …

The Unprecedented Nature of Individual Grief: Trading answers for understanding

If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard someone say they like ambiguity, I’d be pretty broke. Studies show that making ambiguous decisions (based on little or conflicting evidence) actually activates areas of the brain associated with processing fear and emotion; thus proving that fear of the unknown is more than just an ominous …


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